Finding your next adventure...

Southeast Asia Travel News

The Southeast Asia Travel Specialists Since 1999

Prasart Sikhoraphum is a small yet remarkably well-preserved brick, laterite and sandstone Hindu temple complex dating from the 11th-century and lying just east of Surin Town in northeastern Thailand. (The exact reign is unknown but the early 11th-century kings Suryavarman I or Udayadityavarman II look like good suspects. Some descriptions we’ve come across assign the temple to the Suryavarman II…

Little do most people realise when they’re whizzing along in their bright blue bus that many important routes in Thailand’s impressive 21st-century road network follow the traces of, and are built over the top of, ancient roads dating from the Angkor period. (As for example with England’s road infrastructure and the Romans.) The extensive Angkor road network covered not only…

Another excellent and interesting Cambodian overland trip yesterday – the road to Siem Reap in western Cambodia from the cpaital Phnom Penh. First stop was Skuon for the always popular deep-fried ‘tarantulas’. Popular photo subject that is – not always such a popular snack and this time the fried crickets won out over the spiders hands down. Problem with the…

Travelling around Cambodia is never boring; – if you get tired of looking at the ubiquitous sugar palm, paddy-field, water-buffalo combinations then you can be sure that there’ll be some interesting/unusual/crazy sight right around the next bend. Just drove up from Kampot to Phnom Penh on the excellent and freshly upgraded, (give or take a couple of nearly finished bridges),…

Must have visited the ruined Ta Nei Temple some 20 times and am yet to see another visitor there! Moreover, it’s a great little Jayavarman VII site in a picturesque forest setting with some interesting carvings remaining. There’s no road to this temple making it, along with Banteay Tom, one of the rare reasonably-sized Angkor sites that you can’t actually…

“Though the identity of Bakheng Temple (or Phnom Bakheng) is today firmly established, the place hardly gets the respect it deserves…..Late every afternoon, just before sunset, crowds troop up the hill, on foot or by elephant at 20 dollars a ride. Then they climb the temple’s steps to the standing room only, plaza-like upper tier. …….Then they throng back down…

Chau Srei Vibol. Oddly enough my 5-year-old’s favourite Angkor temple!? We were ready to go back to Siem Reap for a cold one whilst she was still taking ‘just one more photo’. Not quite sure why she liked the rarely-visited Chau Srei Vibol so much – maybe all the trees and the hilly terrain  – though even at her age…

Whilst the ‘main’ temples of the UNESCO-listed World Heritage Park are now relatively well looked after there are still thousands of smaller, rarely visited Angkor temples that dot the Cambodian countryside from the suburbs of Phnom Penh to the Lao border, north to the Dandrek Escarpment and south to the cave temples of Kampot. Many of these sites may be…

The ruins of the so-called ‘haunted casino at Bokor, near Kampot in Southern Cambodia, certainly look creepy enough! (Apparently heavy losers at the casino frequently threw themselves off the conveniently placed adjacent clifftop!). Bokor Town, perched high on Bokor Mountain overlooking the Gulf of Thailand, was set up as cool, breezy kind of hill-station-come-resort for hot and sweaty French colonists…

Mu Koh Chang National Marine Park to give it its full name is situated in the eastern Thai province of Trat, abutting Cambodia, (or Cambodian waters to be precise!).  The national park comprises of the mountainous interior and surrounding waters of the large island of Koh Chang, as well as the myriad coral-fringed rocks and smaller islands of the archipelago…

Actually Soi Dao Wildlife Sanctuary rather than a national park as such, (same, same but different as the Thais say, though wildlife sanctuary status is generally considered an upgrade with better protection, stricter regulations and greater prestige), and located in Soi Dao district of Eastern Thailand’s Chantaburi Province. It’s based around the spectacular 5,000 ft Soi Dao Mountain and the…

Khao Phra Viharn, or Preah Vihear in Khmer – and the famous 11th-century Hindu temple itself is 100% Cambodian, whatever various lunatic fringe Thais might claim! (Since most of the local Thais in that part of the kingdom – southern Si Saket Province – speak Khmer anyway they could have just kept the original name instead of the cumbersome Thai…

King Suryavarman I acceded to the throne of Angkor in 1006 after a 4-year struggle with rival claimant Jayaviravarman. One of his initiatives on consolidating control was a regal cocking of the leg (no disrespect intended but it’s a good simile) or marking out of his new territory, by commissioning the construction of 4 temples at the cardinal points of…

Jayavarman IV – c. 921/928 to 941/942   Jayavarman IV is not usually considered one of Cambodia’s most revered rulers. His biography highlights would include:  trashing Angkor, moving the capital into the back of beyond, doing away with several of his relatives and seriously upsetting the palace clique and aristocratic hierarchy. But, is that a case of early fake news…

The slightly underwhelming ruins of Kapilapura at Angkor -probably the least-visited, least-known of any temple that actually appears on most maps of the Angkor Archaeological Park. Just look slightly above and to the right (northeast.) of Angkor Wat on any standard map and you’ll see a small spot marked Kapilapura. What’s interesting about it though, apart from being able to…

An English headmaster created something of a controversy recently when he ate fried tarantulas during a school assembly in Orpington, southeast London! See article… (They never did that sort of thing in my day.) The tarantula was already dead, (obviously) having actually been imported from Cambodia where it’s considered something of a delicacy, and was crunched in order to raise…

Laos’ Four Thousand Islands, or Si Phan Don, region lies just to the north of the Cambodian border in the far south’s Champassak Province. Here the Mekong River widens and shallows dramatically before crashing over the spectacular No islands have bridges to the mainland* and it’s only recently that the larger ones have been added to the national electricity grid…

Oh my god – they’ve put ice in my drink, I’m going to die a horrible death! Southeast Asian ice cubes are a short cut to a stomach pump in the nearest hospital! A commonly believed myth maintained by certain guide books, but these days, in much of the region, simply false. Firstly it’s well known that drinking very cold…